Freeing the innocent and preventing wrongful convictions worldwide

 

The Innocence Network is an affiliation of organizations dedicated to providing pro bono legal and investigative services to individuals seeking to prove innocence of crimes for which they have been convicted, working to redress the causes of wrongful convictions, and supporting the exonerated after they are freed.

Click the map below for information on Innocence Network member organizations around the world.

Map of Innocence Network Members

The Innocence Network


69 organizations from around the world working to exonerate unjustly convicted men and women, including independent nonprofits as well as organizations affiliated with law schools or other educational institutions, units of public defender offices, and pro bono sections of law firms.

Member list and info

globe

The Innocence Network

More info about the Innocence Network, including mission, history, and jobs

bookshelf

Amicus Brief Bank

Read amicus briefs filed by the Innocence Network in cases around the country

clipboard

Join the Network

Criteria and process for joining the Innocence Network, including eligibility and obligations

News


Recent news articles and media mentions from around the Innocence Network

Mid-Atlantic IP Client Lamar Johnson Exonerated

Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project

After 13 years in prison for first-degree murder, a Baltimore man walked free Tuesday afternoon as the Baltimore state’s attorney’s office joined his defense team in asking for his exoneration. State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby formally apologized at a news conference to Lamar Johnson and his family for what her office now believes was his wrongful conviction.

The Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project, which investigates suspected wrongful convictions, began looking into Johnson’s case in 2010. Last year, the project presenting its findings to the state’s attorney’s Conviction Integrity Unit — the first of its kind in Maryland — which, after its own investigation, agreed that Johnson was innocent. Read more.

Exoneration Initiative Client Selwyn Days Exonerated

Exoneration Initiative

Selwyn Days was acquitted Tuesday in the 1996 slayings of an Eastchester millionaire and his home health aide, ending his fifth trial and setting him free after 16 years of incarceration. The verdict, on the second day of deliberations in White Plains, vindicated Days’ claim that he gave a false confession when Eastchester detectives interrogated him in 2001, more than four years after the bodies of Archie Harris and Betty Ramcharan were found in Harris’ 4 Berkley Circle home.

Days and his lawyers held hands as the jury forewoman said “not guilty” to both charges of second-degree murder. Moments later he was able to hug his brother, Stelwyn, who had sat through all five trials. Read more.

CPCS Innocence Program Client Victor Rosario Exonerated

CPCS Innocence Program

A Lowell man who spent three decades in prison has been formally exonerated. Victor Rosario was convicted of setting a 1982 fire in Lowell that killed eight people, including five children. The conviction was based mainly on inspectors determining the fire was intentionally set and a written confession that Rosario says he signed because he was under the influence of drugs and alcohol and did not understand English.

Rosario was released from prison three years ago after the state Supreme Judicial Court upheld a ruling ordering a new trial. The lower court judge said there were questions about his confession and about the fire investigation techniques used decades ago. Read more.

Northern California IP Client Ed Easley Exonerated

Northern California Innocence Project

A team with the Northern California Innocence Project based at Santa Clara University ended 12 years of dogged legal wrangling last week when their client was cleared of molestation charges that put him in prison and made him register as a sex offender.

Ed Easley, a 62-year-old electrician, was accused and convicted of molesting a 7-year-old in Shasta County 24 years ago. Since then, it came to light that he had been scapegoated because the young victim was protecting a juvenile male cousin at the behest of family members. Read more.

 

Michigan Innocence Clinic Client Lamarr Monson Exonerated

Michigan Innocence Clinic

Around the time he confessed to killing 12-year-old Christina Brown in an abandoned apartment, Detroit police came under scrutiny for some of their tactics. Whether LaMarr Monson’s confession to the Jan. 20, 1996, murder would stand up today is a key reason Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy decided to dismiss first- and second-degree murder charges when Monson won a new trial.

In addition to the confession problem, a new witness has testified there was a different killer, newly discovered fingerprints corroborate the witness’s claim, and Detroit police have lost key evidence. Read more.

North Carolina Center on Actual Innocence Client Robert Bragg Gets New Hearing

North Carolina Center on Actual Innocence

A mother and child who testified in a murder trial more than 20 years ago that led to a man’s life sentence may have received $1,000 in reward money, some trips to a theme park and basketball games for the son, according to court filings in the case.

A three-judge panel is set to open a hearing Monday for Robert Bragg as part of North Carolina’s unique innocence process. The 64-year-old inmate is serving a sentence of life in prison without parole in connection with the fatal beating of an elderly man in December 1994. Bragg has maintained innocence throughout his 21 years behind bars, even rejecting a plea deal that carried a 15-year sentence. Read more.