Freeing the innocent and preventing wrongful convictions worldwide

 

The Innocence Network is an affiliation of organizations dedicated to providing pro bono legal and investigative services to individuals seeking to prove innocence of crimes for which they have been convicted, working to redress the causes of wrongful convictions, and supporting the exonerated after they are freed.

Click the map below for information on Innocence Network member organizations around the world.

Map of Innocence Network Members

The Innocence Network


69 organizations from around the world working to exonerate unjustly convicted men and women, including independent nonprofits as well as organizations affiliated with law schools or other educational institutions, units of public defender offices, and pro bono sections of law firms.

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The Innocence Network

More info about the Innocence Network, including mission, history, and jobs

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Read amicus briefs filed by the Innocence Network in cases around the country

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Criteria and process for joining the Innocence Network, including eligibility and obligations

News


Recent news articles and media mentions from around the Innocence Network

IP of Florida Client Dwight DuBose Freed

Innocence Project of Florida

Dwight DuBose walked out of the Orient Road Jail on Tuesday night after trading an orange jumpsuit for a brand new polo shirt and slacks. It was about 9 p.m. He flashed a broad smile and hugged staff members of the Innocence Project of Florida who helped secure his release. Then, the 45-year-old former prison inmate headed over to his mom’s house for his first home-cooked meal in 17 years.

“It’s been a long time,” he said. “I’m kind of nervous about going out there. We live in a fast society.” DuBose was released after DNA testing cast doubt on his guilt in a 2001 Tampa murder. Although he still maintains his innocence, he agreed Tuesday to plead guilty to a lesser charge of second-degree murder in exchange for a declaration of time served. Read more.

Montana IP Client Freddie Joe Lawrence and Co-Defendant Paul Jenkins Freed

Montana Innocence Project

At the foot of Mount Powell, the clean smell of snow and the more evocative smell of manure commingled as wind swept into the parking lot in front of the Montana State Prison’s administration building Tuesday afternoon. 

Then, for the first time in 23 years, 56-year-old Freddie Joe Lawrence emerged from the razor wire and chain link fences as a free man. Triumphantly holding his fists in the air, Lawrence was flanked by Toby Cook and Larry Mansch, two of the Montana Innocence Project lawyers who helped him regain his freedom.

On Friday, Helena District Judge Kathy Seeley vacated the convictions of Lawrence and 64-year-old Paul Jenkins in the 1994 murder of Donna Meagher. Meagher was kidnapped from a family-owned casino in Montana City and killed west of Helena, leading to the convictions of Jenkins and Lawrence in 1995. Read more.

Mark Godsey of the Ohio IP Publishes Op-Ed on Cleveland.com

Ohio Innocence Project

CINCINNATI — Today, the only thing that stops Ru-El Sailor from walking free after serving 15 hard years in prison for a murder that he didn’t commit is the fate of a motion to vacate his conviction. That motion was filed by Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Michael O’Malley.  

If a Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court judge approves O’Malley’s motion, Sailor will join his family, friends, and community in a celebration of justice that we don’t often see in today’s news. Read more. 

Michigan Innocence Clinic Client Richard Phillips Exonerated

Michigan Innocence Clinic

Richard Dan Phillips waited anxiously Wednesday in the hallway of Frank Murphy Hall of Justice. It was a day he had hoped would come for more than four decades.

Phillips, 71, politely answered numerous reporters’ questions while waiting to be asked into the courtroom of Judge Kevin J. Cox in Wayne County Circuit Court. There, all charges against Phillips stemming from a 1971 homicide were dismissed — after he spent 45 years in prison for a crime he insists he didn’t commit.

“Freedom is giving me the hope that no matter what happens in the future, this is a good beginning,” Phillips said. Read more. 

Illinois IP & Exoneration Project Client William Amor Exonerated

Illinois Innocence Project and Exoneration Project

A former Naperville man who spent 22 years in prison for the 1995 death of his mother-in-law was found not guilty in a retrial Wednesday.

Following a seven-day bench trial, DuPage County Judge Liam C. Brennan found 61-year-old William Amor not guilty of murder and aggravated arson in connection with the death of Marianne Miceli, according to a statement from the DuPage County State’s Attorney’s Office.

“This is the end of a nightmare for me,” Amor said in a statement released by the Illinois Innocence Project, which represented him. Read more.

Innocence Project, Exoneration Project, and Center on Wrongful Convictions Clients Corey Batchelor and Kevin Bailey Exonerated

Innocence Project, Exoneration Project and Center for Wrongful Convictions

CHICAGO — Prosecutors have dropped charges against two men who say Chicago police detectives beat them into confessing to a 1989 killing.

Cook County Judge Alfredo Maldonado on Tuesday formally tossed convictions against Corey Batchelor and Kevin Bailey, both age 48. Batchelor was released on parole in 2004 but says he’s glad a judge vacated the convictions. Bailey was still serving an 80-year prison term for the murder, but was released Tuesday.

“28 years, seven months and two long days, I sat up in the penitentiary area, and for what? Nothing!” Bailey said after he was released. Read more.