Freeing the innocent and preventing wrongful convictions worldwide


The Innocence Network is an affiliation of organizations dedicated to providing pro bono legal and investigative services to individuals seeking to prove innocence of crimes for which they have been convicted, working to redress the causes of wrongful convictions, and supporting the exonerated after they are freed.

Click the map below for information on Innocence Network member organizations around the world.

Map of Innocence Network Members

The Innocence Network

69 organizations from around the world working to exonerate unjustly convicted men and women, including independent nonprofits as well as organizations affiliated with law schools or other educational institutions, units of public defender offices, and pro bono sections of law firms.

Member list and info


The Innocence Network

More info about the Innocence Network, including mission, history, and jobs


Amicus Brief Bank

Read amicus briefs filed by the Innocence Network in cases around the country


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Criteria and process for joining the Innocence Network, including eligibility and obligations


Recent news articles and media mentions from around the Innocence Network

Illinois IP & Exoneration Project Client William Amor Exonerated

Illinois Innocence Project and Exoneration Project

A former Naperville man who spent 22 years in prison for the 1995 death of his mother-in-law was found not guilty in a retrial Wednesday.

Following a seven-day bench trial, DuPage County Judge Liam C. Brennan found 61-year-old William Amor not guilty of murder and aggravated arson in connection with the death of Marianne Miceli, according to a statement from the DuPage County State’s Attorney’s Office.

“This is the end of a nightmare for me,” Amor said in a statement released by the Illinois Innocence Project, which represented him. Read more.

Innocence Project, Exoneration Project, and Center on Wrongful Convictions Clients Corey Batchelor and Kevin Bailey Exonerated

Innocence Project, Exoneration Project and Center for Wrongful Convictions

CHICAGO — Prosecutors have dropped charges against two men who say Chicago police detectives beat them into confessing to a 1989 killing.

Cook County Judge Alfredo Maldonado on Tuesday formally tossed convictions against Corey Batchelor and Kevin Bailey, both age 48. Batchelor was released on parole in 2004 but says he’s glad a judge vacated the convictions. Bailey was still serving an 80-year prison term for the murder, but was released Tuesday.

“28 years, seven months and two long days, I sat up in the penitentiary area, and for what? Nothing!” Bailey said after he was released. Read more.

The Exoneration Initiative Client Edward Garry Exonerated

Exoneration Initiative

On Monday, after deliberating for less than half an hour, a Bronx jury vindicated Edward Garry’s twenty-three-year quest to clear his name, finding him not guilty of the 1995 murder of a retired police detective named Oswald Potter. In 2016, I wrote about Garry’s case for The New Yorker. Garry was twenty years old when he was charged with Potter’s murder. Next week, Garry will turn forty-three. He spent his twenties and all of his thirties in prison, and was only let out on bail last year after a judge ordered a new trial for him. One of Garry’s lawyers, Glenn Garber, told me that, when the jury foreman read the new verdict, one of the jurors was crying, and afterward “one of them ran up to him in the hallway and said, ‘I’m sorry this happened to you,’ and hugged him.”

“It still feels like a dream,” Garry said, when I talked to him Monday night. “It didn’t register yet.”

The Bronx district attorney’s office chose to retry Garry despite serious flaws in its case and the fact that the campaign to clear his name had come to include one of the cops who originally helped arrest him. When Darcel D. Clark, the Bronx D.A., took office, in 2016, she started a conviction-integrity unit to review questionable cases. The unit had examined Garry’s case and had not come to a public conclusion, but prosecutors still decided not to back down. (A spokeswoman for Clark said this week that the D.A.’s office does not comment on acquittals.) Read more.


Northern California IP Client Glenn Payne Exonerated

Northern California Innocence Project

Glenn Payne was convicted in 1991 of molesting a 2-year-old girl in San Jose and spent more than 13 years in prison. The crucial evidence against him was expert testimony by a county forensic analyst that hair found on Payne must have come from the victim — that there was only one chance in 129,600 that it had come from someone else.


UVA Innocence Project Clinic Client Messiah Johnson Freed

Innocence at UVA School of Law

The Innocence Project Clinic at the University of Virginia School of Law has secured a conditional pardon for its client, Messiah Johnson, who the clinic argued was wrongly convicted of armed robbery.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe signed orders Friday for the release of Johnson and five others in separate cases. In doing so, he noted the sentences were “far outside what should have been adequate to keep Virginia safe.”

Johnson had been sentenced to 132 years in prison.

“Mr. Johnson has served over 20 years for this crime and yet there are serious questions about his guilt – he has always maintained his innocence and there is credible evidence that he was not guilty at all,” the governor’s office said in its afternoon statement. Read more.

Exoneree James Kluppelberg Wins $9.3 Million Settlement for Wrongful Conviction

Exoneration Project

Chicago officials have agreed to pay $9.3 million to a man wrongfully convicted of setting a 1984 fire that killed a mother and her five children, a crime he confessed to only after he was allegedly beaten by detectives working under disgraced Chicago police Cmdr. Jon Burge.

The proposed settlement in the federal lawsuit brought by James Kluppelberg marks the latest in a string of massive payouts by the city involving cases of alleged police misconduct.

It also adds to the ever-mounting costs of the torture scandal involving Burge and his “midnight crew” of detectives, which has stained the city’s reputation and so far cost taxpayers at least $115 million in lawsuit settlements, judgments and other compensation to victims. Read more.