The Exoneration Initiative Client Edward Garry Exonerated

The Exoneration Initiative Client Edward Garry Exonerated

Exoneration Initiative

On Monday, after deliberating for less than half an hour, a Bronx jury vindicated Edward Garry’s twenty-three-year quest to clear his name, finding him not guilty of the 1995 murder of a retired police detective named Oswald Potter. In 2016, I wrote about Garry’s case for The New Yorker. Garry was twenty years old when he was charged with Potter’s murder. Next week, Garry will turn forty-three. He spent his twenties and all of his thirties in prison, and was only let out on bail last year after a judge ordered a new trial for him. One of Garry’s lawyers, Glenn Garber, told me that, when the jury foreman read the new verdict, one of the jurors was crying, and afterward “one of them ran up to him in the hallway and said, ‘I’m sorry this happened to you,’ and hugged him.”

“It still feels like a dream,” Garry said, when I talked to him Monday night. “It didn’t register yet.”

The Bronx district attorney’s office chose to retry Garry despite serious flaws in its case and the fact that the campaign to clear his name had come to include one of the cops who originally helped arrest him. When Darcel D. Clark, the Bronx D.A., took office, in 2016, she started a conviction-integrity unit to review questionable cases. The unit had examined Garry’s case and had not come to a public conclusion, but prosecutors still decided not to back down. (A spokeswoman for Clark said this week that the D.A.’s office does not comment on acquittals.) Read more.