UBC Innocence Project Celebrates A Decade of Investigating Wrongful Conviction Claims

UBC Innocence Project at the Allard School of Law

While wrongful conviction cases seem dramatic in Hollywood movies, the day-to-day reality is far from glamorous. It is more about inventorying “boxes upon boxes” of police documents, mounting court challenges to see a psychiatrist’s letter, and shuffling through musty file folders, said Tamara Levy, who has spent most of the last decade focused on this work. “It can be really tedious.”

The case of Phillip James Tallio, reported this week by Postmedia, has brought attention to the UBC Innocence Project at the Allard School of Law, which Levy co-founded in 2007. Tallio has been in jail since 1983 for the murder of a child. But since the beginning of his sentence, he has steadfastly proclaimed his innocence, according to the lawyers trying to appeal his conviction. Next month, Tallio’s case will go before a judge on the preliminary question of whether the court should consider the case. Read more.