Korey Wise Innocence Project: Post-Graduate Fellowship Program

Korey Wise Innocence Project: Post-Graduate Fellowship Program

THE KOREY WISE INNOCENCE PROJECT The Korey Wise Innocence Project (KWIP) at Colorado Law is dedicated to correcting and preventing wrongful convictions in Colorado. We represent people with claims of actual innocence by reinvestigating their cases and then bringing new evidence of innocence to court. In addition to litigating individual cases, we also use public education and legislative reform to push for systemic change in the criminal legal system.   KWIP receives requests for help from inmates in the Colorado Department of Corrections who assert that they are innocent and have been wrongly convicted. KWIP screens these applications to assess whether (1) the applicant has a credible claim of factual innocence, and (2) there is a reasonable possibility of uncovering new evidence and overturning the conviction. In promising cases, KWIP conducts factual investigation, consults with experts, and pursues litigation. As a project of the law school, KWIP incorporates volunteers from the law school, undergraduate programs, and the general community in the screening, investigation, and litigation of cases.  KWIP is also involved in legislative and community reforms based on the lessons learned from the cases we investigate and litigate.  FELLOWSHIP BRIEF DESCRIPTION KWIP’s post-graduate fellowship is a two-year position. Through the fellowship, a recent law graduate committed to serving the public good will have the opportunity to work with wrongfully convicted individuals and their families.  KWIP seeks applicants for its inaugural fellowship beginning Fall 2020 or early 2021.   DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES The Post-Graduate Fellow will have a host of responsibilities and opportunities for growth, including the following: Assist in screening applications. The fellow will learn how to critically review a...

Operations Coordinator – Georgia Innocence Project

Title: Operations Coordinator Position type: Salaried, full time, non-exempt Salary: $36,000+, depending on experience Benefits: Generous time off, flex spending benefits credits, and professional development SUMMARY: The Georgia Innocence Project (GIP) is a non-profit legal organization dedicated to correcting and preventing the wrongful conviction of innocent people in Georgia, and helping exonerees rebuild their lives. The Operations Coordinator reports to the Operations Director, and is responsible for data standardization and systems administration in the following areas: OFFICE ADMINISTRATION ○ Answer phones, document calls, forward relevant information ○ Collect, scan, and distribute mail; take mail and packages to post office ○ Manage main email inbox, respond to inquiries and forward messages as needed ○ Maintain office appearance and inventory ○ Serve as point of contact with building management and maintenance ○ Assist with internal and external events INTAKE DATABASE ADMINISTRATION ○ Oversee input and standardization of intake-related data in Clio case database ○ Process, scan, document and distribute case-related mail ○ Coordinate responses to initial requests for assistance ○ Help evaluate completed intake questionnaires and communicate with applicants ○ Discuss status of application stage cases with Intake Manager DEVELOPMENT DATABASE ADMINISTRATION ○ Oversee input and standardization of donor data in Bloomerang donor database ○ Record, scan, and process incoming gifts and donations ○ Generate donation acknowledgements and prepare acknowledgments for mailing. ○ Help Development Manager maintain and organize donor database ○ Assist in preparation of donor communications ○ Generate fundraising and donation reports QUALIFICATIONS AND SKILLS ○ Bachelor’s degree required, and 2+ years similar experience preferred ○ Experience working with and managing databases strongly preferred ○ Tech savvy, able to...

Innocence Project Calls for Policy Reforms in Wake of Landmark Report on 25 Wrongful Convictions in Brooklyn

On July 9, 2020 the Kings County District Attorney’s Office released a landmark report examining how and why the KCDA’s Conviction Review Unit (CRU) in Brooklyn, New York, agreed to exonerate 25 wrongly convicted people in a five-year period (between 2014-2019). These 25 wrongly convicted persons served a staggering 426 years in prison before their exonerations. And virtually all of them — 24 out of 25 — were Black and/or Latinx. They served an average of over 17 years in prison; the one white exoneree, a victim of a politically motivated election fraud prosecution, served no prison time. The report also finds that the evidence police gathered against many of these exonerees was clearly flawed from the outset — raising obvious questions about why so many Brooklyn citizens of color were prosecuted at all, and why none of the system’s actors stepped in to halt these prosecutions or rectify them for decades. The report forthrightly addresses the grievous errors – including outright misconduct in a number of cases — by both police and prosecutors that tainted the vast majority of these cases.  For more information, please visit the Innocence Project blog...

Life Sentence Vacated For Man Who Spent 41 Years In Shirley Prison

CPCS Innocence Program  After spending more than 40 years in a Shirley prison, Raymond Champagne had his life sentence vacated Tuesday by a judge who allowed the motion for a new trial. Champagne was convicted in 1979 for participating in the 1978 stabbing death of Stephen L. Curvin while an inmate at the Massachusetts Correction Institution at Cedar Junction in Walpole. He steadfastly maintained his innocence, but was given a life sentence and sent to the Souza-Baranowski Correctional Center, which straddles the Lancaster town line. Lisa Kavanaugh, the director of the Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS) Innocence Program, took on Champagne’s case in October. She filed a motion for new trial, citing newly discovered evidence that cast doubt on the conviction.  For more details on the case, see...
As a Philly judge agreed to overturn a murder conviction after 31 years, the DA’s Office took aim at the justice system

As a Philly judge agreed to overturn a murder conviction after 31 years, the DA’s Office took aim at the justice system

Pennsylvania Innocence Project  Philadelphia prosecutors on Friday offered a scathing assessment of how the city’s criminal justice system functioned in the late 1980s and early 1990s, saying that as annual murder totals rose to unprecedented heights, the police detectives tasked with investigating those killings were often willing — or eager — to press forward with flawed arrests in order to move on to their next case. The appraisal, offered by Assistant District Attorney Andrew Wellbrock, came as the District Attorney’s Office successfully pushed to overturn the murder conviction of Andrew Swainson, 55, who spent 31 years in prison for a drug-related killing he has always denied committing. For more information see...