Staff Attorney – California Innocence Project

California Western School of Law (CWSL) is looking for a CIP Fellow to work for the California Innocence Project (CIP). This position will be responsible for reviewing claims for innocence arising from convictions occurring within Southern California. The CIP Fellow will train under the CIP Staff; supervise interns, volunteers, volunteer attorneys, and students; supervise intake in the office, including intake management; engage in habeas petitions and legal writing as needed; and participate in litigation and case preparation as needed. The Staff Fellow position is a one-year position with the possibility of a second year depending on experience and performance during the first year. This is a full-time position funded by grants and/or private foundation resources. For more information about the California Innocence Project (CIP), please view CIP’s website at https://californiainnocenceproject.org/ Primary Responsibilities (include but not limited to): Supervise interns, volunteers, volunteer attorneys, and students in case review, case processing, and investigations. Also responsible for supervising volunteers and interns during CIP-sponsored events. Supervise intake of mail and correspondence, including intake management of potentially viable innocence cases. Review the written work of interns, volunteers, and students during the grant period. Review claims of innocence arising from convictions occurring within Southern California. Train under CIP staff in the areas of post-conviction work, avenues for relief, and other related legal issues. Preparing and delivering educational presentations on the criminal justice system and the work of CIP to local groups, classes, and interested individuals and supporters. As needed, engage in legal writing of habeas petitions, post-convictions motions, and case memoranda. As needed, participate in litigation preparation and case preparation on activated cases where CIP has...
Pro Bono Coordinating Attorney – Georgia Innocence Project

Pro Bono Coordinating Attorney – Georgia Innocence Project

Position type: Salaried, exempt Salary: $50,000 – $52,000 (depending on experience) Benefits: Generous flexible spending benefits, time off, and professional development Georgia Innocence Project (GIP) is a non-profit legal organization dedicated to preventing and correcting the wrongful conviction of innocent people in Georgia. The Pro Bono Coordinating Attorney position is a two-year Department of Justice grant-funded position. The Pro Bono Coordinating Attorney is responsible for working with pro bono lawyers and legal professionals to assist in the screening stage of GIP cases, in order to evaluate those cases and advance them toward exoneration or other resolution. The Pro Bono Coordinating Attorney would work with the Conviction Integrity Unit (CIU) at the Fulton County District Attorney’s Office (FCDA). The Pro Bono Coordinating Attorney also will work closely with GIP’s legal team, and will report directly to GIP’s Executive Director or her designee. PRIMARY DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES ● Work with GIP’s legal team to design and implement a system and associated trainings for volunteers to assist in case file review, digest, and assessment of GIP’s screening-stage cases ● Work with FCDA CIU to identify cases with highest chances of wrongful conviction ● Work with GIP’s Paralegal to submit and track Open Records Act requests and responses ● Draft co-counsel agreements and memorandums of understanding as appropriate ● Streamline work product templates, documents and file sharing methods for pro bono counsel ● Create check-in and accountability systems and implement the same ● Create written procedures and manuals to standardize trainings and GIP’s pro-bono program ● Train pro bono counsel and provide continuing support as needed ● Interact routinely with pro bono coordinators...
Korey Wise Innocence Project: Post-Graduate Fellowship Program

Korey Wise Innocence Project: Post-Graduate Fellowship Program

THE KOREY WISE INNOCENCE PROJECT The Korey Wise Innocence Project (KWIP) at Colorado Law is dedicated to correcting and preventing wrongful convictions in Colorado. We represent people with claims of actual innocence by reinvestigating their cases and then bringing new evidence of innocence to court. In addition to litigating individual cases, we also use public education and legislative reform to push for systemic change in the criminal legal system.   KWIP receives requests for help from inmates in the Colorado Department of Corrections who assert that they are innocent and have been wrongly convicted. KWIP screens these applications to assess whether (1) the applicant has a credible claim of factual innocence, and (2) there is a reasonable possibility of uncovering new evidence and overturning the conviction. In promising cases, KWIP conducts factual investigation, consults with experts, and pursues litigation. As a project of the law school, KWIP incorporates volunteers from the law school, undergraduate programs, and the general community in the screening, investigation, and litigation of cases.  KWIP is also involved in legislative and community reforms based on the lessons learned from the cases we investigate and litigate.  FELLOWSHIP BRIEF DESCRIPTION KWIP’s post-graduate fellowship is a two-year position. Through the fellowship, a recent law graduate committed to serving the public good will have the opportunity to work with wrongfully convicted individuals and their families.  KWIP seeks applicants for its inaugural fellowship beginning Fall 2020 or early 2021.   DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES The Post-Graduate Fellow will have a host of responsibilities and opportunities for growth, including the following: Assist in screening applications. The fellow will learn how to critically review a...

Innocence Project Calls for Policy Reforms in Wake of Landmark Report on 25 Wrongful Convictions in Brooklyn

On July 9, 2020 the Kings County District Attorney’s Office released a landmark report examining how and why the KCDA’s Conviction Review Unit (CRU) in Brooklyn, New York, agreed to exonerate 25 wrongly convicted people in a five-year period (between 2014-2019). These 25 wrongly convicted persons served a staggering 426 years in prison before their exonerations. And virtually all of them — 24 out of 25 — were Black and/or Latinx. They served an average of over 17 years in prison; the one white exoneree, a victim of a politically motivated election fraud prosecution, served no prison time. The report also finds that the evidence police gathered against many of these exonerees was clearly flawed from the outset — raising obvious questions about why so many Brooklyn citizens of color were prosecuted at all, and why none of the system’s actors stepped in to halt these prosecutions or rectify them for decades. The report forthrightly addresses the grievous errors – including outright misconduct in a number of cases — by both police and prosecutors that tainted the vast majority of these cases.  For more information, please visit the Innocence Project blog...

Life Sentence Vacated For Man Who Spent 41 Years In Shirley Prison

CPCS Innocence Program  After spending more than 40 years in a Shirley prison, Raymond Champagne had his life sentence vacated Tuesday by a judge who allowed the motion for a new trial. Champagne was convicted in 1979 for participating in the 1978 stabbing death of Stephen L. Curvin while an inmate at the Massachusetts Correction Institution at Cedar Junction in Walpole. He steadfastly maintained his innocence, but was given a life sentence and sent to the Souza-Baranowski Correctional Center, which straddles the Lancaster town line. Lisa Kavanaugh, the director of the Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS) Innocence Program, took on Champagne’s case in October. She filed a motion for new trial, citing newly discovered evidence that cast doubt on the conviction.  For more details on the case, see...